WBUR

A Day After Buffer Zone Ruling, Anti-Abortion Advocates Are Inside Boston Clinic’s Yellow Line

A day after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the 35-foot buffer zone around Massachusetts abortion clinics violates free speech, Theresa Gorey on Friday attempts to hand out literature to a woman leaving a Planned Parenthood clinic on Commonwealth Avenue in Boston. A representative of the clinic stands on the sidewalk, waiting to assist anyone coming in. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

A day after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the 35-foot buffer zone around Massachusetts abortion clinics violates free speech, Theresa Gorey on Friday attempts to hand out literature to a woman leaving a Planned Parenthood clinic on Commonwealth Avenue in Boston. A representative of the clinic stands on the sidewalk, waiting to assist anyone coming in. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

BOSTON — A day after the nation’s highest court ruled that buffer zones around abortion clinics violate the free speech rights of anti-abortion advocates, activists at a clinic in Boston are speaking with patients inside the yellow line that used to create a protesting barrier.

Ray Neary was outside the Planned Parenthood on Commonwealth Avenue late Friday morning. He said his advocacy was much more personal than in years past.

Protester Theresa Gorey (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Protester Theresa Gorey (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

“We were able much more in a close situation to be more personal with the individuals going in,” he said. “I noticed that immediately. There’s a certain freedom to it, where you’re not yelling and sounding like you’re obtrusive in some way.”

On Thursday, after the ruling, Neary was protesting outside of the yellow line.

A representative of Planned Parenthood was also outside on Friday, waiting to assist anyone walking into the facility.

Following the unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Massachusetts lawmakers pledged Thursday to introduce and enact new buffer zone legislation by the end of next month.

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