Support the news

Daily Rounds: Post-Hurricane Injuries; Avoiding Back-To-School Bugs; Rethinking Wellness; Tracking Tainted Supplements

Your risk of injury rises after the hurricane - USATODAY.com "When everyone is hunkered down during a storm, we don't see a lot of injuries," Gauding says. "We see injuries as people go outside on ladders and try to clean up. These are people who use chain saws only once a year, and suddenly they are getting themselves hurt." (yourlife.usatoday.com)

Simple Things To Do To Lessen Back-To-School Stomach Bugs : Shots - Health Blog : NPR So if you want to keep bagged lunches safe, here are three things to try: 1). Put your insulated lunch bags in the freezer overnight so that they're starting out much cooler in the morning.
2). When using ice packs, use two of them and bookend them on either side of the perishable foods. 3). Wash hands and counters before making lunches. This is probably the most important tip. (npr.org)

A healthy corporation - Boston.com "Spring, 37, made this transformation with the help of her employer, John Hancock Financial, which sponsors a wide range of fitness, nutrition, and health screening programs aimed not only at making employees healthier, but also controlling health insurance costs. With an investment of less than 1 percent of total health costs in wellness programs, Hancock has reduced medical expenses enough to keep annual premium increases, on average, about 3 percentage points below the national trend." (articles.boston.com)

Drugs Posing as Supplementals May Contain Dangerous Ingredients - NYTimes.com "Industry representatives say a vast majority of supplements are safe, and they fault regulators for failing to stop the influx of illegal products from places like China. But few seem willing to tackle the problem openly. Unlike, say, the fashion industry, which has lobbied for increased regulation to combat knock-off products and has vociferously publicized the issue, the supplement industry is at best waging a whisper campaign. “We walk a fine line,” says Steve Mister, president of the Council for Responsible Nutrition, a trade group in Washington that represents supplement manufacturers and ingredient suppliers. “We want to protect consumers, but we also don’t want to alarm consumers so they stay away from the whole marketplace.” (nytimes.com)

This program aired on August 29, 2011. The audio for this program is not available.

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news