What's Next In Egypt, And Where Are Youth Leaders?14:32
Download

Play
Khayrat el-Shater, the lead strategist for Egypt's largest opposition group, hugs Hassan Malek, a prominent businessman and group financier, right, in Cairo, Egypt after the two were released from prison. (AP)
Khayrat el-Shater, the lead strategist for Egypt's largest opposition group, hugs Hassan Malek, a prominent businessman and group financier, right, in Cairo, Egypt after the two were released from prison. (AP)

It was just last month that the world's attention was on Tahrir Square, and the youthful protesters there, organized through Facebook and Twitter, demanding democracy and an end to corruption. Listeners may remember that when President Hosni Mubarak stepped down, we reached a weary but jubilant Wael Ghonim, the Google executive who'd become the face of the opposition.

But the military is now running Egypt, reportedly in tacit agreement with the formerly-banned Islamist group the Muslim Brotherhood. In fact, one young member of the opposition has started a new "movement to save the revolution", calling for civilians to be a part of the government transitional council, something that was talked about during the revolt but seems to have been forgotten.

We speak with two Egyptians of different generations who are watching the situations closely, Boston University researcher Farouk El-Baz, and Harvard teaching assistant Soha Bayoumi.

This program aired on March 30, 2011.

Support the news

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news