Dispute Over Libya Attack: Reporter Says Militants Attacked Because Of Video, Not 9-1113:20
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Libyan followers of the Ansar al-Shariah Brigades chant anti-U.S. slogans during a protest in September, as part of widespread anger over a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. The Libyan-based Islamic militant group Ansar al-Shariah is one of the leading suspects in the attack on the U.S. consulate in Libya that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans. (AP/Mohammad Hannon)
Libyan followers of the Ansar al-Shariah Brigades chant anti-U.S. slogans during a protest in September, as part of widespread anger over a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. The Libyan-based Islamic militant group Ansar al-Shariah is one of the leading suspects in the attack on the U.S. consulate in Libya that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans. (AP/Mohammad Hannon)

Election year politics has clouded public understanding of what happened one month ago during the deadly attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. In Tuesday's New York Times, reporter David Kirkpatrick tries to try to clarify what happened and why.

He asks whether the attack grew out of anger over an American-made anti-Islam film, or whether it was waged by al-Qaida operatives seeking to mark the 11th anniversary of the 9-11 attacks.

Guest:

This segment aired on October 16, 2012.

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