Calculating Sandy's Toll On U.S. Economy09:56
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A worker uses a backhoe to move sand near a boardwalk that was destroyed by superstorm Sandy in Atlantic City, N.J., on Wednesday. (Patrick Semansky/AP)
A worker uses a backhoe to move sand near a boardwalk that was destroyed by superstorm Sandy in Atlantic City, N.J., on Wednesday. (Patrick Semansky/AP)

Goods shipments delayed. Workers not being paid for lost hours. Billions of dollars in property loss. Damage to public and private infrastructure. Shops, restaurants, Broadway theaters closed. Oil refineries damaged and down, with possible increases in gas prices. Millions without power. Public transportation and commerce disrupted in the nation's most populous region.

Families, public officials and economists are beginning to take stock of the economic cost of Hurricane Sandy.

Washington Post reporter Steve Mufson says that for one thing, the hurricane proved that not all commerce moves on the Internet highway - we still live in a brick and mortar world.

Guest:

This segment aired on October 31, 2012.

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