Accelerating the pace of engineering and science.

Support the news

How Art Can Develop Your Brain11:05Download

Play
Can looking at modern art help you become more creative?  Art historian Joanthan Fineberg thinks so. (Pixabay)MoreCloseclosemore
Can looking at modern art help you become more creative? Art historian Joanthan Fineberg thinks so. (Pixabay)
Jonathan Fineberg is author of "Modern Art at the Border of Mind and Brain." (Marianne Malone)
Jonathan Fineberg is author of "Modern Art at the Border of Mind and Brain." (Marianne Malone)

Can looking at modern art help you become more creative? Art historian Jonathan Fineberg thinks so.

He says that when we look at works like Christo and Jeanne-Claude's "Surrounded Islands," in which 11 islands in Biscayne Bay were surrounded by floating pink fabric, "what they do is they open up your consciousness so that everything around you looks like you never saw it before."

Fineberg discusses his new book, "Modern Art at the Border of Mind and Brain," with Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson.

Artwork Discussed In This Segment

Jean Dubuffet, “Fluence,” 1984. (Photo by Ellen Page Wilson, courtesy of Pace Gallery. Copyright © 2013 Jean Dubuffet / Artists Rights Society (ars), New York / adagp, Paris.)
Jean Dubuffet, “Fluence,” 1984. (Photo by Ellen Page Wilson, courtesy of Pace Gallery. Copyright © 2013 Jean Dubuffet / Artists Rights Society (ars), New York / adagp, Paris.)
Robert Motherwell, “At Five in the Afternoon,” 1948-49. (Estate of Helen Frankenthaler. Licensed by VAGA, New York)
Robert Motherwell, “At Five in the Afternoon,” 1948-49. (Estate of Helen Frankenthaler. Licensed by VAGA, New York)
Christo and Jeanne-Claude, “Surrounded Islands,” 1980-1983. (Aerial photo by Jonathan Fineberg)
Christo and Jeanne-Claude, “Surrounded Islands,” 1980-1983. (Aerial photo by Jonathan Fineberg)
Alexander Calder, "Dog," 1926-31, wood, clothespin and wire. (Copyright © Calder Foundation, New York/Art Resource, NY)
Alexander Calder, "Dog," 1926-31, wood, clothespin and wire. (Copyright © Calder Foundation, New York/Art Resource, NY)
Joan Miró, “Spanish Dancer” (danseuse espagnole), 1928, feather, cork and hatpin on wood panel with Ripolin. Centre Pompidou, Musée national d'art moderne–Centre de création industrielle, Paris. (Private collection. Artists Rights)
Joan Miró, “Spanish Dancer” (danseuse espagnole), 1928, feather, cork and hatpin on wood panel with Ripolin. Centre Pompidou, Musée national d'art moderne–Centre de création industrielle, Paris. (Private collection. Artists Rights)

Guest

This segment aired on August 24, 2015.

+Join the discussion
Share
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news