Here & Now Here & Now

Support the news

Everglades Health, Sea Level Rise Are Bipartisan Issues In South Florida10:51

Play
 A view from the Tamiami Trail, which cuts across Florida, and forms part of the northern border of Everglades National Park. (Peter O'Dowd/Here & Now)closemore
A view from the Tamiami Trail, which cuts across Florida, and forms part of the northern border of Everglades National Park. (Peter O'Dowd/Here & Now)

The environment is a big, complex issue in South Florida. The Everglades ecosystem relies on a supply of fresh water flowing south, but the development of Florida has hindered that flow.

Closer to the coast, places like Miami Beach are dealing with the threat of rising seas. Policymakers in both places are coming up with ways to deal with these issues. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson reports.

Susy Torriente is assistant city manager and chief resiliency officer in Miami Beach. She's pictured at a park that has seen an increase in flooding, which the city attributes to sea level rise and climate change. (Peter O'Dowd/Here & Now)
Susy Torriente is assistant city manager and chief resiliency officer in Miami Beach. She's pictured at a park that has seen an increase in flooding, which the city attributes to sea level rise and climate change. (Peter O'Dowd/Here & Now)
Jim Murley, chief resilience officer for Miami Dade County, is pictured on the Tamiami Trail. Engineers are raising the road to let fresh water flow south. (Peter O'Dowd/Here & Now)
Jim Murley, chief resilience officer for Miami Dade County, is pictured on the Tamiami Trail. Engineers are raising the road to let fresh water flow south. (Peter O'Dowd/Here & Now)

Reporter

+Join the discussion
Share

Support the news

Next Up

Where to now?

More Here & Now or Explore Audio.