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How Speed Training Games Could Cut Dementia Risk By Half05:31Download

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There’s new evidence that playing a very specific type of computer game, one associated with a  skill called speed training, could cut the risk of developing dementia ten years later by up to 48 percent. (Adikos/Flickr)MoreCloseclosemore
There’s new evidence that playing a very specific type of computer game, one associated with a skill called speed training, could cut the risk of developing dementia ten years later by up to 48 percent. (Adikos/Flickr)

There’s new evidence that playing a very specific type of computer game — one associated with a skill called speed training — could cut the risk of developing dementia 10 years later by up to 48 percent.

A study presented at this year’s Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto shows that speed training, unlike memory training or reasoning exercises, actually staves off mental decline.

Here & Now's Eric Westervelt talks with Jerri Edwards, lead researcher on the study, called “Active, Advanced Cognitive Training in Vital Elderly.”

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Guest

Dr. Jerri Edwards, associate professor in the School of Aging Studies at the University of South Florida.

This segment aired on August 1, 2016.

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