American Privacy Through History, From Colonial-Era Searches To World War II09:48
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The housing barracks, built by the U.S. Army Engineer Corps, at the internment center where Japanese Americans were relocated in Amache, Colo., are shown on June 21, 1943. (AP Photo)MoreCloseclosemore
The housing barracks, built by the U.S. Army Engineer Corps, at the internment center where Japanese Americans were relocated in Amache, Colo., are shown on June 21, 1943. (AP Photo)

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faced 10 hours of questioning on Capitol Hill combined over the course of Tuesday and Wednesday. The topics were wide-ranging, but largely focused on privacy.

Historians Brian Balogh (@historyfellow) and Nathan Connolly (@ndbconnolly) speak with Here & Now's Lisa Mullins about the long history of American privacy and infringement, stretching back to Colonial-era search and seizure and the early origins of the National Security Agency.

Balogh and Connolly are co-hosts of the podcast "BackStory," which is produced at Virginia Humanities.

This segment aired on April 12, 2018.

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