Ocean Currents Weakening To 1,000-Year Low, Studies Say09:39
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A drop of water falls off an iceberg melting in the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord near Nuuk in southwestern Greenland, Aug. 1, 2017. The iceberg calved off a glacier from the Greenland ice sheet, the second largest body of ice in the world which covers roughly 80 percent of the country. Greenland's glaciers have been melting and retreating at an accelerated pace in recent years due to warmer temperatures. If all of that ice melts, sea levels will rise by several meters, though there will be regional differences. (David Goldman/AP)MoreCloseclosemore
A drop of water falls off an iceberg melting in the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord near Nuuk in southwestern Greenland, Aug. 1, 2017. The iceberg calved off a glacier from the Greenland ice sheet, the second largest body of ice in the world which covers roughly 80 percent of the country. Greenland's glaciers have been melting and retreating at an accelerated pace in recent years due to warmer temperatures. If all of that ice melts, sea levels will rise by several meters, though there will be regional differences. (David Goldman/AP)

An ocean current that helps regulate the global climate system is slowing down. That's the conclusion of two new studies published in the journal Nature. Scientists disagree about what's behind the weaker ocean currents, but it could be bad news for the climate.

Here & Now's Lisa Mullins speaks with David Thornalley of University College London (@UCLgeography).

This segment aired on April 13, 2018.

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