How Long Could Hawaii's Volcano Destruction Go On?03:46
Download

Play
A plume of volcanic gas mixed with smoke from fires caused by lava rises amidst clouds in the Leilani Estates neighborhood, in the aftermath of eruptions from the Kilauea volcano on May 6, 2018 in Pahoa, Hawaii. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)MoreCloseclosemore
A plume of volcanic gas mixed with smoke from fires caused by lava rises amidst clouds in the Leilani Estates neighborhood, in the aftermath of eruptions from the Kilauea volcano on May 6, 2018 in Pahoa, Hawaii. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

More than two dozen homes have been destroyed in Hawaii since Kilauea volcano's latest eruption began Thursday. The ground has split open, spewing dangerous levels of sulfur dioxide and molten rock.

For a look at the science, Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Einat Lev (@einatlev), volcanologist and assistant research professor at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University.

This segment aired on May 7, 2018.

Related:

Support the news

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news