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Judge Releases List Of Tsarnaev Jurors

In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, second from right, is depicted with his lawyers, left, beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addressed a pool of potential jurors in early January. (Jane Flavell Collins/AP)closemore
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, second from right, is depicted with his lawyers, left, beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addressed a pool of potential jurors in early January. (Jane Flavell Collins/AP)

Nearly nine months after a jury sentenced Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to death for carrying out the Boston Marathon bombings alongside his brother, the judge in the case has released the names of the jurors who decided his fate.

The release of the jury list comes more than two weeks after Judge George O'Toole Jr. ordered the court to begin unsealing some documents related to the case.

There are more than 1,600 filings in the case, including documents, motions and details from the bombing investigation — many of which were filed under seal, meaning the public couldn't see what they said. More than 600 sealed documents were made public in January. Many other filings in the case still remain under seal.

In his order, O’Toole said the court would move “as expeditiously as practicable” to make public sealed documents in the case.

WBUR is working to contact the jurors from the case for on-the-record conversations about their experiences. We've decide not to publish the list of their names at this time. Here are profiles of the unidentified jurors, based off of their testimony during jury selection.

There were seven women and five men on the jury. One was from Boston while rest came from across the state including Cape Cod, the North Shore and the South Shore.

In August, Kevan Fagan, “Juror 83”, sat down for an interview with WBUR. The 23-year-old was the first juror to speak out about the high-profile case. Fagan told WBUR that he may not have voted for the death penalty if he had known some of the bombing victims wanted Tsarnaev to get life in prison.

“If I had known that, I probably — I probably would change my vote. But then again, if I knew that I wouldn’t be on the jury either,” he said in the interview.

The trial included several weeks of emotional testimony from survivors, as well as graphic photos and videos of the bombing, which killed three people and injured more than 260 others.

Tsarnaev was found guilty of all 30 charges against him last April, during the first phase of the trial. In the second phase of the trial, the 12-member jury decided Tsarnaev's fate after 14-and-a-half hours of deliberation in May. The decision had to be unanimous for Tsarnaev to get the death penalty. Otherwise, he would have automatically been sentenced to life in prison without parole — a sentence most registered voters in Boston said Tsarnaev should receive, a WBUR poll in March found.

Tsarnaev was formally sentenced to death in June and apologized to the victims and their loved ones for the attack.

He is being held in the supermax prison in Florence, Colorado.

WBUR joined The Boston Globe in filing a motion for the jury list to be made public.

In another high profile federal case in Boston -- the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger, who was sentenced to life in prison in November 2013 — it took about two weeks for the the jury list to be released.

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Zeninjor Enwemeka Digital Reporter
Zeninjor Enwemeka is a digital reporter at WBUR, covering all things relevant to people in Greater Boston.

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