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Low — But Slightly Higher Than Expected — Voter Turnout In Boston's Election

Voting was slow in many poling places, as of 11:00 AM only 91 voters had turned out at the Boys And Girls Club in Dudley Sq. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)MoreCloseclosemore
Voting was slow in many poling places, as of 11:00 AM only 91 voters had turned out at the Boys And Girls Club in Dudley Sq. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Boston's mayoral race is over, and Mayor Marty Walsh will return to City Hall for another four years.

But the incumbent mayor's race against his challenger, City Councilor Tito Jackson, wasn't exactly a nail-biter: Walsh won his second term with a nearly 2-to-1 margin of the vote.

The non-partisan contest failed to inspire the same level of excitement among Bostonians that the highly competitive 2013 mayoral contest, Boston's first open mayoral race in a generation, did.

Election officials reported relatively light voter turnout in most of the city's precincts, with 108,909 of the city's roughly 392,000 registered voters — that's 27 percent — casting ballots.

To put that in context, even with fewer individuals registered to vote in 2013, significantly more voters — about 142,000, or nearly 40 percent -- turned out to determine one of the city's most competitive elections in decades.

That said, the turnout wasn't as low as Secretary of State William Galvin initially predicted on Monday when he said he expected about 90,000 voters to cast their ballots. He took to Twitter Tuesday afternoon to revise his forecast.

With additional reporting from The Associated Press

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Lisa Creamer Twitter Digital Producer
Lisa Creamer is a digital producer at WBUR.

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