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Panel Round Two

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Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Maz Jobrani, Paula Poundstone and Adam Felber. And, here again is your host, at the Nokia Theater in downtown Los Angeles, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: In just a minute, Carl settles the debate and says the best baseball team in Southern California is the Los Angeles Angels of Ana-Rhyme.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-Wait-Wait. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Paula, there's a new dating site available for people who are tired of Match.com. This dating site is run by whom?

PAULA POUNDSTONE: And I am.

SAGAL: I bet.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: This dating site is run by whom?

POUNDSTONE: Well, there's Christiansingles.com.

SAGAL: No, not Christian Singles. This is an organization that's been around for a while, but they're just now getting into the internet dating business.

POUNDSTONE: It's an organization that's been around for a while. The CIA?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I like it.

ADAM FELBER: You will never know we dated.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: This group may be tired of Match.com, but they're also tired in general.

POUNDSTONE: There's a tired group.

SAGAL: Well, they nap.

POUNDSTONE: Toddlers.

SAGAL: No.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: That would be strange. Other end of the age spectrum.

POUNDSTONE: Wait, old people.

SAGAL: Yeah, which are the...

POUNDSTONE: But they're the organizers.

SAGAL: No, no, the organizers of the website site are...

POUNDSTONE: AARP.

SAGAL: Yes, the AARP has a dating website.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: It's a new service.

POUNDSTONE: They keep sending me cards.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: I've about had it with them. Because I feel that when I want their cards, I will let them know.

MAZ JOBRANI: Right.

SAGAL: I understand.

(APPLAUSE)

POUNDSTONE: So you know what I do?

SAGAL: What do you do, Paula?

POUNDSTONE: I cut them up, that's what I do. I get the cards; I cut them up. And you know what I figure? Eventually I'm going to get to an age where I can't cut them up anymore and I'm in.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Won't have the hand strength to make the scissors work.

POUNDSTONE: I don't want to be a part of AARP. So wait, so now they're doing a dating service?

SAGAL: Yes, they are. You see, the idea is like, you know, a lot of demographic groups have their own dating service. J-Date is for Jews. OK Cupid is for cherubs.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The AARP announced this week it's partnering with a site called How-About-We.com. How-About-We.com. And this will be a dating site for people who finish that sentence with "Watch '60 Minutes' and call it a night."

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Paula, famously rude Vogue editor Anna Wintour may have the perfect job lined up for her next. What is it?

POUNDSTONE: She might be the ambassador to London.

SAGAL: Exactly right, yes, a U.S. ambassador.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Bloomberg News reported that the editor of Vogue, who is also was a big fundraiser for President Obama, is being considered for one of the two plum postings in the diplomatic corps: Britain because she's British by birth, or France because she speaks fluent rude.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: Oh-la-la.

SAGAL: It's not unusual for wealthy donors to be appointed as ambassadors to those two countries, but usually, as one White House reporter put it, "diplomats have to be diplomatic."

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The concern is that like six months after she goes to Britain, say, we'll be at war because our ambassador said Buckingham Palace makes the Queen look fat.

(LAUGHTER)

FELBER: You know, Anna Wintour could help the queen. The queen is always dressed in like bright - like remember at the wedding, she had a bright yellow - she looked like a pimp. She looks like a pimp, the queen.

JOBRANI: Yeah. Yeah, she does.

(LAUGHTER)

FELBER: Seriously, the only people that get away with bright yellow outfits are pimps and the queen. I think Anna Wintour should get there and be like, "less pimp, Queen."

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: Why are pimps choosing to dress like the Queen of England, is my question.

SAGAL: Maz, a new study shows one third of young adults use social media while doing what?

JOBRANI: One third of young people use social media while watching television.

SAGAL: No.

JOBRANI: While using other social media.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: I've sent that before.

SAGAL: Oh yeah.

JOBRANI: I've seen it. You got the iPad and the phone and the computer and you're just like...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No.

JOBRANI: No?

SAGAL: None of those things would be shocking or slightly disgusting.

JOBRANI: Oh, it's a shocking, slightly disgusting thing.

SAGAL: Yes.

JOBRANI: Going to the bathroom.

SAGAL: Of course.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

JOBRANI: Oh, that's not just young people.

SAGAL: Well...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You don't need to take a survey, its obvious with some status updates, like "Look what I had for dinner yesterday."

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: You know why...

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: You know why they take it to the bathroom.

SAGAL: Why?

JOBRANI: Because they make it so small and easy. If it were the big computer of the old days, you couldn't be like, oh, let me just take this and plug it in while I do my business.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: You can't do that. But now, ha, ha.

SAGAL: Yeah. It is a little disgusting, but it is better than the old days when you'd be sitting there in a stall and hear a typewriter from the next one. That was awful.

(LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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