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The Future of the News45:59
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Newspapers are sold on Jan. 21, 2009, in the Studio City area of Los Angeles. (AP)
Newspapers are sold on Jan. 21, 2009, in the Studio City area of Los Angeles. (AP)

Advertising, vanished. Profits, gone. Losses, mounting very rapidly. Around the country, newsrooms are being hollowed out, papers are shrinking, some are letting go of daily publication. Some are going away.

So, what if? What if your local newspaper just disappeared? In a world of red ink, bankruptcies, layoffs and cutbacks, it’s possible. So, what then?

This hour, On Point: Newspapers going down — and radical steps for radical times in the news business.

You can join the conversation. Do you see a future for the newspaper as we know it? And what steps up if newspapers go down?Guests:

Joining us from New York is Jay Rosen, professor of journalism at New York University and author of the blog PressThink, where he writes about the future of the press. He's also author of the book “What Are Journalists For?”

Also joining us from New York is David Folkenflik, media reporter for NPR. He's just completed a two-part series on the future of newspapers. Before he joined NPR in 2004, he spent more than a decade at The Baltimore Sun.

And joining us from San Diego is Andrew Donohue, co-executive editor of the non-profit investigative news site, Voice of San Diego.

This program aired on February 9, 2009.

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