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Muslim Americans Looking Within45:57
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The five Americans arrested in Pakistan, from left, Waqar Hussain, Ramy Zamzam, Umar Farooq, Ahmad Minni, Aman Yemer are seen in Sargodha, Pakistan, in this photo released by Sargodha Police Department. (AP)
The five Americans arrested in Pakistan, from left, Waqar Hussain, Ramy Zamzam, Umar Farooq, Ahmad Minni, Aman Yemer are seen in Sargodha, Pakistan, in this photo released by Sargodha Police Department. (AP)

The five faces of young Muslim Americans now in prison in Pakistan have been all over TV for a week. Held by Pakistanis, they allegedly tried to join Islamic extremists in Pakistan.
Young Americans out of Virginia. Picked up after their own families worried to authorities about their children’s apparent alienation and attraction to jihad.
This was not supposed to be an American problem. But after years of U.S. action in Islamic lands, and appeals by Muslim radicals, it is.
This hour, On Point: national security and tension in the Islamic American community.
You can join the conversation. Tell us what you think — here on this page, on Twitter, and on Facebook.Guests:

Alejandro Beutel, government liaison for the Muslim Public Affairs Council and author of the recent report "Building Bridges to Strengthen America: Forging an Effective Counterterrorism Enterprise between Muslim Americans and Law Enforcement."

Juan Carlos Zarate, senior adviser for the Center for Strategic and International Studies' Transnational Threats Project and a security analyst for CBS. He served as deputy assistant to the president and deputy national security adviser for combating terrorism from 2005 to 2009.

Imam Mahdi Bray, a civic activist and leader who works closely with Muslim American youth. He serves as executive director of Muslim American Society Freedom Foundation, a Washington-based advocacy group affiliated with the Muslim American Society.

This program aired on December 15, 2009.

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