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After 'No Child Left Behind'24:09
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Education Secretary Arne Duncan looks on at left as President Barack Obama meets with students at Wright Middle School in Madison, Wis., Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2009. (AP)
Education Secretary Arne Duncan looks on at left as President Barack Obama meets with students at Wright Middle School in Madison, Wis., Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2009. (AP)

No Child Left Behind has had American education by the scruff of the neck for years now, with the tests and deadlines and failure tags and penalties that have had American schools both on their toes and in an uproar ever since it was made the law of the land under George W. Bush.
Now, the Obama administration is proposing its own answer to the Bush-era federal program.
The Obama plan would scrap the language and much of the guts of No Child Left Behind. And bring on its own blueprint.
Is it a fix? A surrender? An advance?
This hour, On Point: after No Child Left Behind.

Guests:

Jonathan Kaufman, Pultizer Prize-winning reporter and education editor at Bloomberg News. He has been following the rollout of the new education blueprint and its reception by lawmakers and educators.

Charles Barone, director of federal policy at the advocacy group Democrats for Education Reform.  From 2001 and 2003, he served as Deputy Staff Director for the House Education and Labor Committee under Democratic Congressman George Miller of California, a principle player in the passage of No Child Left Behind.

Jeanne Allen, president of the Center for Education Reform. She's a critic of the Obama administration's new education plan and an advocate for school choice.

Dr. Susan Gourley, superintendent of public shools in Lincoln, Nebraska.

This program aired on March 18, 2010.

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