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Lourdes Garcia–Navarro On The Arab Spring45:53
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NPR’s Lourdes Garcia –Navarro, back from Egypt and the sands of Libya, on the new season of the Arab Spring.

A Libyan wounded youth holds up portraits of martyrs during the celebration at Saha Kish Square in Benghazi, Libya, Sunday Oct. 23, 2011 as Libya's transitional government declare liberation of Libya after months of bloodshed that culminated in the death of longtime leader Moammar Gadhafi. (AP)
A Libyan wounded youth holds up portraits of martyrs during the celebration at Saha Kish Square in Benghazi, Libya, Sunday Oct. 23, 2011 as Libya's transitional government declare liberation of Libya after months of bloodshed that culminated in the death of longtime leader Moammar Gadhafi. (AP)

The Arab Spring is deep in autumn now. Still challenging and changing the face of the Arab world from North Africa to the Middle East. Still challenging onlookers around the world as they try to follow and understand exactly what is going on.

Today, we talk with a reporter who has been in the thick of it, from Tahrir Square to the deserts of Libya. NPR’s Lourdes Garcia-Navarro has seen it all. Reported it deeply. So has her husband, Times of London Mideast correspondent James Hider. They’re with us.

This hour On Point: giving witness to the Arab Spring.
-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Lourdes Garcia–Navarro, NPR correspondent covering the Middle East and based in Jerusalem.

James Hider, Times of London Middle East correspondent.

Photos

Lourdes Garcia-Navarro in the On Point studio. (Alex Kingsbury/WBUR)
Lourdes Garcia-Navarro in the On Point studio. (Alex Kingsbury/WBUR)
James Hider in the On Point studio. (Alex Kingsbury/WBUR)
James Hider in the On Point studio. (Alex Kingsbury/WBUR)

From Tom's Reading List

NPR "NATO's role in Libya was crucial to the rebellion that toppled Moammar Gadhafi, but that assistance came at a cost, according to some Libyans."

NPR
"This was the day so many here had been waiting for, a dictator dead, a new country born. In towns and cities and villages, there was fireworks and feasting that lasted into the early hours of the morning. The formal announcement of the end of eight months of bitter fighting came in Benghazi - Libya's new leaders wanting the liberation ceremony to take place where the uprising began on February 17th. "

This program aired on November 8, 2011.

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