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Making Our Workplaces Work For Everyone46:59Download

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Big thinker and working mom Anne-Marie Slaughter sparked debate when she wrote “Why Women Still Can’t Have it All.” She’s back talking about a toxic work world.

Anne-Marie Slaughter, former Dean of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School, stands next to former Pakistan foreign minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi in Princeton, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2008. (AP)
Anne-Marie Slaughter, former Dean of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School, stands next to former Pakistan foreign minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi in Princeton, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2008. (AP)

Anne-Marie Slaughter’s career trajectory has been almost as high as they come. Big jobs. Big profile.  A professor and power player at Harvard, Princeton, the top tier of the State Department and on. But three years ago, Slaughter came out with a big essay saying American women – whatever their career - can’t have it all. There is, she said, too little support to make a barn-burning career and good family life all work out. She’s been thinking about how to make it work. And it may require the husband, the partner, hanging back. Staying home. This hour On Point,  Anne-Marie Slaughter and her husband on work and family now.
-- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Anne-Marie Slaughter, President and CEO of New America. Author of the new book, "Unfinished Business: Women, Men, Work, Family." Professor emerita of politics and international affairs at Princeton University, where she was dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Former director of policy planning for the US State Department. (@SlaughterAM)

Andrew Moravcsik, husband of Anne-Marie Slaughter. Professor of politics and director of the European Union Program at Princeton University.

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Anne-Marie Slaughter’s ‘Unfinished Business’ -- "But why, Slaughter wondered, is caring for children — surely a social good and an understandable impulse among people who have them — so often treated as a nuisance at the office? Why should employees be furtive about their ­parent-teacher conferences when so many colleagues and bosses are also parents? Women surged into the professional workplace decades ago. Yet the ideal worker is still imagined as either a single person or someone with a spouse at home to take care of all family matters."

The Atlantic: Why I Put My Wife’s Career First — "The nearly impossible expectations facing professional women pose a stark dilemma for ambitious young people planning two-career marriages. One option is to try to tough it out, which some couples manage, but others do not. A recent study of Harvard Business School graduates reveals that the vast majority of alumnae initially expect their career and their spouse’s career to rank equally."

CNN Money: Business school professors to Congress: It's time for paid family leave — " It's time to adopt a paid family and medical leave policy in the U.S. That's the message more than 200 faculty members from some top business schools are telling Congress. A letter signed by 203 professionals from 88 business schools across the country was sent to Congress urging them to pass the Family and Medical Insurance Leave Act (FAMILY Act)."

Read An Excerpt Of "Unfinished Business" By Anne-Marie Slaughter

https://www.scribd.com/doc/282742076/Excerpt-from-Unfinished-Business-by-Anne-Marie-Slaughter

This program aired on September 28, 2015.

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