Support the news

Political Upheaval In The U.K. And France47:24Download

Play

What now for Britain and France, after stunning election losses by Theresa May and a likely parliamentary majority for Emmanuel Macron?

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks outside 10 Downing Street in London, on, Friday, June 9, 2017. Prime Minister Theresa May's gamble in calling an early election backfired spectacularly as her Conservative Party lost its majority in Parliament, throwing British politics into chaos. (Jonathan Brady/AP)
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks outside 10 Downing Street in London, on, Friday, June 9, 2017. Prime Minister Theresa May's gamble in calling an early election backfired spectacularly as her Conservative Party lost its majority in Parliament, throwing British politics into chaos. (Jonathan Brady/AP)

First came the electoral shocker in Britain. Conservative prime minister Theresa May, rebuked at the polls. British voters turning their backs on the driver of the Brexit, opening their arms to the UK’s Labour Party. Then came France this weekend. Old parties of the right and left scorned. Voting that looks to give 39-year-old newly-elected president Emmanuel Macron a huge majority in the French parliament for his brand new centrist party. This hour On Point: the UK and France turn politics upside-down. -- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

David Rennie, Washington bureau chief and Lexington columnist at The Economist. (@DSORennie)

Lionel Barber, editor of the Financial Times. (@lionelbarber)

Gaby Hinsliff, columnist at The Guardian. Former political editor of the Observer. (@gabyhinsliff)

Ryan Heath, senior EU correspondent at POLITICO. (@PoliticoRyan)

From Tom's Reading List

New York Times: For Britain, Political Stability Is a Quaint Relic — "Once considered one of the most politically stable countries in the world, regularly turning out majority governments, Britain is increasingly confusing and unpredictable, to both its allies and itself. Far from settling the fierce divisions exposed by last year’s referendum on Britain’s exit from the European Union, or Brexit, the election on Thursday only made them worse."

The Guardian: Theresa May won’t survive long. Tory modernisers are already plotting — "It’s hard to think of a fall more vertiginous, a hubris more complete, than that of Theresa May. Even Boris Johnson’s self-immolation during last year’s Conservative leadership contest had a certain predictability. It was hardly the first time he’d shot himself in the foot. But with May, it’s different. She takes risks rarely, and only after thorough consideration. She tends towards under-confidence not arrogance. How did she, of all people, end up recklessly gambling everything on what many voters clearly saw as an overly presumptuous and entitled referendum on herself, and losing?"

POLITICO: Brussels doubts Theresa May can stick to Brexit timetable — "EU officials doubt Britain will be in a position to begin Brexit talks on June 19 as previously scheduled after Prime Minister Theresa May lost her majority in British parliament in Thursday’s general election. While official-level communication between London and Brussels remains open, senior EU officials said negotiators don’t expect to get down to substantial political-level talks until the government in Westminster is more secure."

 

This program aired on June 12, 2017.

+Join the discussion
Share
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news