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Reflecting On 2017: The Year In Civil Rights14:00
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Baltimore city workers remove graffiti from the pedestal where a statue dedicated to Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson stood Aug. 16, 2017 in Baltimore. The city removed four statues of Confederate heroes from city parks overnight, following the weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Va.  (Win McNamee/Getty Images)MoreCloseclosemore
Baltimore city workers remove graffiti from the pedestal where a statue dedicated to Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson stood Aug. 16, 2017 in Baltimore. The city removed four statues of Confederate heroes from city parks overnight, following the weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Va. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Michael Curry joins us to review the civil rights stories that made headlines in 2017 and what we can expect in 2018.

This year, Boston elected the most diverse city council in the city's history. But this election is not indicative of racial equality elsewhere in Boston: a new Spotlight series has highlighted how racism has permeated many aspects of life, from higher education to healthcare.

Meanwhile, civil rights have been effected nationally by elections, including the inauguration of President Donald Trump and Doug Jones' recent win in Alabama.

Guest

Michael Curry, the former president of the Boston branch of the NAACP and a member of the National NAACP's Board of Directors.

This segment aired on December 28, 2017.

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