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Corporations Feel The Pressure To Get Political18:30
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A Dick's Sporting Goods store is seen in Arlington Heights, Ill., Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. Dick's Sporting Goods announced Wednesday that it will immediately end sales of assault-style rifles and high capacity magazines at all of its stores and ban the sale of all guns to anyone under 21. Dick's had cut off sales of assault-style weapons at Dick's stores following the Sandy Hook school shooting. But Dick's owns dozens of its Field & Stream stores, where there has been no such ban in place. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)MoreCloseclosemore
A Dick's Sporting Goods store is seen in Arlington Heights, Ill., Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. Dick's Sporting Goods announced Wednesday that it will immediately end sales of assault-style rifles and high capacity magazines at all of its stores and ban the sale of all guns to anyone under 21. Dick's had cut off sales of assault-style weapons at Dick's stores following the Sandy Hook school shooting. But Dick's owns dozens of its Field & Stream stores, where there has been no such ban in place. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Kroger Company, the largest supermarket chain in the United States, will tighten its gun selling policies in response to last month's deadly school shooting in Parkland, Florida. Kroger is the third major retailer, after Dick's Sporting Goods and Walmart, to change its policies while lawmakers debate their response to the shooting.

We discuss how corporations decide when to take a side in social and political debates and the changing role of corporations in American democracy.

Guests

Derek Thompson, senior editor at The Atlantic. He tweets @dkthomp.

Herman "Dutch" Leonard, a professor of public management and business administration at Harvard University.

Chris Walsh, social mission activism manager of Ben and Jerry's, which tweets @benandjerrys.

This segment aired on March 1, 2018.

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