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Wet, Cloudy June Is Water-Logging Farms Across Massachusetts03:02
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Steve Parker of Parker Farms in Lunenberg, Mass., says his carrots are doing well despite the rain. (WBUR)
Steve Parker of Parker Farms in Lunenberg, Mass., says his carrots are doing well despite the rain. (WBUR)

There might be an unusual sight in the sky on this last day in June: the sun. Wednesday's forecast calls for morning clouds and fog, giving way to some afternoon sunshine. It's an anomaly in this dreary month. It's been the cloudiest June in more than 100 years. Cloudy, yes, but not always rainy. Though it hardly seems likely, Boston rainfall is slightly below normal.

Channel 5 Meteorologist Mike Wankum said the cloudy, damp weather results from a weather pattern called a trough. "It's an upper-level wind that sort of dips down along the East Coast and then up over Greenland," Wankum said. "So basically what happens is storms get caught in that and they don't move out. If they would move out, like typically happens in the summer, then we'd have periodic showers and then we'd go to sunshine."

The weather has not made it any easy year for many Massachusetts farmers. For more on how the dreary weather is affecting agriculture, we spoke to Ruth Hazzard, a vegetable specialist from the UMass Extension Vegetable Program, which works with agricultural industries across the state.

This program aired on June 30, 2009.

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