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Mass. Regulators OK Cannabis Retailer In Great Barrington And Grow Operation In Franklin

In Leicester, Cultivate workers help customers at the counter during the first day of recreational marijuana sales in Massachusetts. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
In Leicester, Cultivate workers help customers at the counter during the first day of recreational marijuana sales in Massachusetts. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
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State regulators have granted final approval for a retail marijuana store in Great Barrington, in the southwestern corner of Massachusetts, and a growing facility in Franklin to begin full operations later this week.

The Cannabis Control Commission on Monday issued a notice authorizing Theory Wellness to begin selling non-medical marijuana to adults 21 or older at its Great Barrington location, which currently operates as a medical marijuana dispensary.

If it opens on Friday, which is the earliest date the CCC will allow it to open to non-medical customers, Theory Wellness would be the sixth non-medical retailer to open in Massachusetts, joining other stores in Northampton, Easthampton, Leicester, Salem and Wareham.

According to CCC records, the Great Barrington store at 394 Stockbridge Road was granted a provisional license on Oct. 18, initially inspected by CCC staff on Oct. 29 and was granted a final license on Dec. 13.

The CCC on Monday also issued a notice authorizing New England Treatment Access to begin cultivation and product manufacturing operations for non-medical cannabis at its Franklin facility. NETA has already opened a recreational store in Northampton but had secured permission to transfer inventory from its medical supply.

NETA has been approved to grow up to 50,000 square feet of marijuana at 5 Forge Parkway in Franklin, and to produce cannabis concentrates, vaporizer cartridges, chocolate bars, chocolate caramels, lozenges, gummies, chocolate-covered morsels, baked goods, lotion, salve, capsules, tinctures and cooking oil, according to CCC documents.

Late last month, CCC Chairman Steven Hoffman said the CCC is in a "rhythm" now that could result in four to eight new retail stores coming online each month. The commission will meet on Thursday and is expected to vote to authorize more so-called final licenses. Getting from final licensure to commencing operations has taken roughly three to five weeks for the other businesses that have opened.

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