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A Brief Breakdown Of Where The Boston Mayoral Candidates Stand On Climate Change

In this Feb. 24, 2006 file photo, a wind turbine stands generating power next to the Hull, Mass., High School in the shadow of Boston. The Obama administration faces a tough choice in the bitter, long-running fight over plans to build the nation's first offshore wind farm off Cape Cod. Two of President Obama's key allies are on opposite sides: Sen. Edward Kennedy, a leading foe of the project, and Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick. (Stephan Savoia/AP)
In this Feb. 24, 2006 file photo, a wind turbine stands generating power next to the Hull, Mass., High School in the shadow of Boston. The Obama administration faces a tough choice in the bitter, long-running fight over plans to build the nation's first offshore wind farm off Cape Cod. Two of President Obama's key allies are on opposite sides: Sen. Edward Kennedy, a leading foe of the project, and Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick. (Stephan Savoia/AP)

All five major candidates in the Boston mayoral election have proposed measures to help deal with climate change. Here are highlights for each of the candidates:

Michelle Wu

  • Proposed the first city-level Green New Deal in the U.S.
  • Promises carbon neutrality by 2040, 100% renewable energy by 2030 and a net-zero municipal footprint by 2024.

Andrea Campbell

  • Wants every resident to live within walking distance of a park or green space.
  • Calls for city operations to be carbon neutral and run on 100% renewable energy by 2035.

Annissa Essaibi George

  • Pledges to make structural updates to Boston Public Schools, which make up the majority of city-owned buildings.
  • Essaibi George has pushed for renewable energy job training at Madison Park Vocational Technical High School.

John Barros

  • Plans to dedicate 20% of Boston’s capital budget to climate resilience projects.
  • Supports citywide carbon neutrality by 2050.

Kim Janey

  • Appointed Boston’s current chief of environment, energy and open space.
  • Plans to allocate $4 million to the Green Jobs program.

Related:

Jenny Kornreich WBUR News Fellow
Jenny Kornreich is a WBUR news fellow.

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