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'Restoring Opportunity' To America's Schoolchildren15:18
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David Gonzales takes a photo of Denycia Rubio, Haley Santana Gonzales and Jackie Guillen before their graduation from a headstart graduation ceremony for four-year-old pre-K students. (Lynn Hermosa/AP)
David Gonzales takes a photo of Denycia Rubio, Haley Santana Gonzales and Jackie Guillen before their graduation from a headstart graduation ceremony for four-year-old pre-K students. (Lynn Hermosa/AP)
This article is more than 6 years old.

Last week, we asked what Mayor Walsh can do to reduce a widening gap between the rich and poor here in Boston.

But the issue goes far beyond Boston. In his State of the Union address last month, President Obama emphasized the importance of the American Dream.

"Opportunity is who we are," said Obama. "And the defining project of our generation must be to restore that promise."

There are strategies that combat economic inequality — more affordable housing and more jobs, for example.

But a good education has maybe the most potential to level the playing field. The problem is, a good school can be difficult to come by for low-income kids.

Guests

Greg Duncan, distinguished professor of education at the University of California, Irvine. Author of "Restoring Opportunity: The Crisis of Inequality and the Challenge for American Education."

Richard Murnane, economist and professor of education and society at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Author of "Restoring Opportunity: The Crisis of Inequality and the Challenge for American Education."

More

The Atlantic: How Public Schools Can Fight Back Against Inequality

  • "Rising income inequality over the past 40 years has imposed a double burden on schools serving low-income children. First, the technological changes and globalization that have fueled inequality have also increased the skills required for good jobs."

EDWeek: My Take On Duncan And Murnane's New Book: Restoring Opportunity

  • "Duncan and Murnane argue that the answer is not more money, test-based accountability, revamping district practices and structures, or expanding school choice. They argue that the evidence is that the promise of any of these strategies is quite limited."

Excerpt

This segment aired on February 14, 2014.

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