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Assessing Desegration In Boston Schools Forty Years After Court Ruling29:57
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Police guard as Boston begins a school busing program on September 12, 1974 to integrate under a court order. (PBR/AP)
Police guard as Boston begins a school busing program on September 12, 1974 to integrate under a court order. (PBR/AP)
This article is more than 5 years old.

Forty years ago, Judge Arthur Garrity wrote that the Boston School Committee had deliberately created two school systems: one for whites, one for blacks. As a remedy, he ordered that students be bused across the city in order to desegregate schools. The decision ignited a firestorm of controversy and violence. The impact of the decision remains a source of intense emotion and debate in Boston today.

Guests

Jim Vrabel, Boston historian and author of the forthcoming book A People's History of the New Boston due out next month.

Michael Patrick MacDonald, grew up in South Boston’s Old Colony housing project, author of All Souls: A Family Story From Southie.

Donna Bivens, director of the Union of Minority Neighborhoods' Boston Busing/Desegregation Project.

This segment aired on June 20, 2014.

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