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Hiawatha Bray On Technology: Peeking Through Periscope05:34
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 This Friday, Oct. 18, 2013, file photo shows a Twitter app on an iPhone screen, in New York. Twitter bought the company behind live video-streaming app Periscope earlier this year for a reported $100 million. (AP)
This Friday, Oct. 18, 2013, file photo shows a Twitter app on an iPhone screen, in New York. Twitter bought the company behind live video-streaming app Periscope earlier this year for a reported $100 million. (AP)
This article is more than 6 years old.

Broadcasting live video from remote parts of the country once meant satellite trucks, van-loads of equipment, technicians and lots of money.

Now, live video is an app away, with services like Twitter's Periscope and Meerkat, among others. But what does the power of live mean for the web? For our interactions with it? For copyright? And by the way, is there anything worth watching?

Guests

Hiawatha Bray, technology writer for the business section of The Boston Globe. He’s also author of the new book, “You Are Here: From the Compass to GPS, the History and Future of How We Find Ourselves.” He tweets @GlobeTechLab.

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The Boston Globe: Everyone Can Broadcast. But Will Anyone Watch?

  • "I love to visit the Globe’s pressroom and watch as the newspaper is printed. And as I watched on Tuesday, I had plenty of company — 70 other people who joined my pressroom excursion by tuning in on their iPhones. We had hooked up with Periscope, a new app from the social network Twitter that lets Apple iPhone owners broadcast live video of pretty much anything."

This segment aired on April 2, 2015.

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