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Using Transparency To Close The Gender Wage Gap25:01
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Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md. speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in 2009, in favor of the "Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act." (Susan Walsh/AP)
Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md. speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in 2009, in favor of the "Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act." (Susan Walsh/AP)
This article is more than 6 years old.

Pat yourself on the back, Boston. On average, Bostonians have the best educated women of any major city, and on average, women here earn 83 cents to each dollar earned by men. That's better than the 77 cents to the dollar nationally.

But of course, it's still not one-to-one. So at both the city and state level, significant efforts are underway to close the gender wage gap. And they're all aimed at increasing transparency when it comes to what men and women are paid.

In Boston, Mayor Marty Walsh is gathering salary data from more than 60 companies. The city will break down the data based on gender, race, job category, and length of employment, and promises to make the information public this summer.

At the state level, legislators are also pushing a new bill that would require employers to post base salaries for open positions, and prevent companies from punishing employees who talk about their salaries openly. But will it work? How important is greater transparency to closing the gender wage gap?

Guests

Victoria Budson, executive director of the Women and Public Policy Program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, which tweets @wappphks.

Christina Hoff Sommers, resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. She tweets @CHSommers.

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Cognoscenti: The Gender Wage Gap Is Much More Troubling Than We Thought

  • "The story line for the gender wage gap debate focuses primarily on women trying to gain ground in male-dominated professions. In other words: Can women achieve pay equity in the 'Boys Club?' The answer, unfortunately, seems to be no and has been for 50 years."

This segment aired on April 13, 2015.

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