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What The N.H. Trial Of A Teen Accused Of Rape Says About Teens, Sex And Consent24:30
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Former St. Paul's student Owen Labrie confers with his lawyer before the start of the second day of his trial at Merrimack County Superior Court in Concord, N.H., Wednesday. (Geoff Forester/The Concord Monitor/AP)
Former St. Paul's student Owen Labrie confers with his lawyer before the start of the second day of his trial at Merrimack County Superior Court in Concord, N.H., Wednesday. (Geoff Forester/The Concord Monitor/AP)
This article is more than 5 years old.

Under cross examination in a Concord, New Hampshire, courtroom, a 16-year-old girl sobbed as she said, "I was raped. I was violated in so many ways." The girl has accused former fellow student, 19-year-old Owen Labrie, of sexually assaulting her while at the elite St. Paul's prep school.

The alleged attack took place just days from graduation last year, as part of a campus ritual called "senior salute," where senior boys seek out sexual encounters with younger students. Prosecutors are focusing on what they call a disturbing "culture" at the school, while defense attorneys say the encounter was consensual. They're highlighting seemingly flirtatious emails sent between Labrie and the girl before and after the incident.

And, above all, the case forces all of us to take an honest, unflinching look at teens and sexual assault.

Guests

Nancy Gertner, Harvard Law School professor and former Massachusetts federal judge.

Abigail Jones, senior writer at Newsweek and co-author of "Restless Virgins: Love, Sex, and Survival in Prep School." She tweets @AbigailDJ.

Sarah Miller, doctoral candidate in sociology at UMass Amherst and former director of education and training at Rape Victim Advocates.

More

The New York Times: Accuser In St. Paul’s Rape Case Defends Account In Cross-Examination

  • "The cross-examination began with questions about oral sex, emails, and uncomfortable laughter."

This segment aired on August 20, 2015.

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