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Barry Goldwater And The Future Of The GOP19:30
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Sen. Barry Goldwater accepts the Republican presidential nomination in San Francisco, July 16, 1964 with a blast at the Democrats and a promise that "together we will win" in the November election. (AP)
Sen. Barry Goldwater accepts the Republican presidential nomination in San Francisco, July 16, 1964 with a blast at the Democrats and a promise that "together we will win" in the November election. (AP)
This article is more than 4 years old.

We take a deeper dive on the Republican National Convention and its history. Former RNC Chairman Bill Brock says he feels the party needs to be more inclusive to attract more Americans.

Is that the direction the GOP will take with Donald Trump at the helm? After a contentious, fractured race with 17 presidential hopefuls, we've seen a vocal "never Trump" faction vowing to sit this election out. What does this all mean for the future of the party?

In a front-page commentary for The Boston Globe, David Shribman argues that Barry Goldwater's failed presidential bid in 1964 ultimately altered the trajectory of the party, Donald Trump's candidacy may do the same.

Guests

David Shribman, executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and a Pulitzer Prize-winning former politics correspondent for the Globe.

Molly Ball, national political correspondent for The Atlantic magazine. She tweets @mollyesque.

This segment aired on July 20, 2016.

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