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When The 1968 Democratic Convention Erupted In Violence, American Politics Changed Forever26:47
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Hubert H. Humphrey speaks to the crowd during the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Ill., Aug. 29, 1968. (AP Photo)
Hubert H. Humphrey speaks to the crowd during the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Ill., Aug. 29, 1968. (AP Photo)

Fifty years ago this week, violence erupted in the streets of Chicago as Democrats from around the country gathered to nominate their presidential candidate.

Protesters converged on the city all week to oppose the party's disregard of the antiwar candidates. The party establishment was set on the nomination of then-Vice President Hubert Humphrey, who supported the Vietnam War.

On the evening of Aug. 28, anger and frustration exploded in the streets inside of and outside of the convention, as police brutally clashed with the protesters. The night had long-term political consequences that changed the trajectory of the nation.

Guests

David Shribman, executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and a Pulitzer Prize-winning former politics correspondent for the Globe. His latest piece is called "Chicago 1968: When It All Changed." He tweets @ShribmanPG.

Gov. Michael Dukakis, former governor of Massachusetts. He was a state representative in 1968 and was inside the convention hall on Aug. 28.

This segment aired on August 31, 2018.

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