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5 Things To Do This Weekend From A Hip-Hop Declaration To Women Artists Shattering Ceilings

Here's what's on tap this weekend:

STL GLD's Album Release | Friday, Feb. 1 | Oberon, Cambridge 

The Boston hip-hop outfit STL GLD drops its new album, “The New Normal,” a searing response to the Trump administration and a musical evolution for the band. (Read more about the new album from my colleague Arielle Gray.)


'Howardena Pindell: What Remains To Be Seen' | Opens Friday, Feb. 1 | Rose Art Museum, Waltham

Beginning this weekend, the Rose Museum will be overtaken by a vast retrospective of the artist Howardena Pindell. Throughout her decades-long career, Pindell has explored structural inequality and racism in her art, most notably through her use of dots and circles, a reference to the stickers found on dishware in the segregated South. The museum will host a conversation with the artist on Saturday. (Read more about the artist's work and legacy from my colleague Pamela Reynolds.)

Howardena Pindell's "What Remains to Be Seen." (Courtesy of the artist)
Howardena Pindell's "What Remains to Be Seen." (Courtesy of the artist)

'Kusama: Infinity' | Sunday, Feb. 3 (and again Feb. 24) | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

In January, the ICA announced it had acquired one of Yayoi Kusama’s famous infinity mirror rooms. “Kusama: Infinity,” a documentary about the 89-year-old Japanese artist, looks at the challenges she faced as a young, non-white woman trying to break into the art world in the ‘60s and how she managed to become one of the highest-selling artists alive.


'MELT' | Through March 7 | Fort Point Arts Center, Boston

A collaborative project between the artists Isabel Beavers and Laine Rettmer, “Melt” brings feminist and sci-fi philosophies to bear on ancient Norse mythology and the Icelandic landscape. The work seeks to create new mythologies through video, photography and sculpture.


'Othello' | Through Feb. 9 | American Repertory Theater, Cambridge

The Oregon Shakespeare Festival offers a powerful update to “Othello,” via the American Repertory Theater. Set in the present-day, its title character cast as an immigrant, this version makes subtle and clever use of a modern backdrop characterized by xenophobia and racism.

(Courtesy Natasha Moustache)
(Courtesy Natasha Moustache)

Amelia Mason Twitter Arts And Culture Reporter
Amelia Mason is an arts and culture reporter and critic for The ARTery, WBUR's arts and culture team. She covers everything from fine art to television to the inner workings of the Boston music scene.

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