NYC Schools Expand Contraceptive Access In Pilot Program04:58
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The Plan B' One-Step, an emergency contraceptive, is now being offered at a handful of New York City public schools.(AP/Barr Pharmaceuticals)
The Plan B' One-Step, an emergency contraceptive, is now being offered at a handful of New York City public schools.(AP/Barr Pharmaceuticals)

A pilot program in New York City has been providing the Plan B, sometimes called the morning after pill, along with other contraceptives to students in a handful of city schools.

Connecting Adolescents to Comprehensive Health Care program or CATCH has been operating as a pilot program since January. It was first introduced in five schools but over the course of the year it expanded to 14.

One school dropped the program citing a lack of resources. City schools have provided condoms to students since the '90s, but students now have the option to get the pill or Plan B,  through their school nurse.

Students under 17 are still required to have a prescription, which they can get from a city health department doctor.

There are plans to expand the contraceptives the program offers to include injectable birth control. Parents were informed of the program through a letter and they were given the option to opt out their children, but only one to two percent of students have been opted out.

About 1,000 students have received chemical birth control through the program.

Guest:

  • Anemona Hartocollis, metro Reporter for the New York Times

This segment aired on September 26, 2012.

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