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Death Toll After Earthquake Passes 4,000 As Aid Arrives06:33
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Nepalese villagers watch as relief material is brought in an Indian air force helicopter for victims of Saturday'’s earthquake at Trishuli Bazar in Nepal, Monday. (Altaf Qadri/AP)
Nepalese villagers watch as relief material is brought in an Indian air force helicopter for victims of Saturday'’s earthquake at Trishuli Bazar in Nepal, Monday. (Altaf Qadri/AP)
This article is more than 6 years old.

The death toll in Nepal continues to climb, two days after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake devastated much of the country, including the densely-populated capital city of Kathmandu, and set off avalanches on Mount Everest.

More than 4,000 people are confirmed dead, including at least 18 on Mount Everest, but that number is expected to rise. Search and rescue teams have not yet reached some remote, mountain villages near the quake's epicenter.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR's Kirk Siegler, in Kathmandu.

"There are certain parts of the city that are much worse off than others," Siegler said. "For instance, where I am, I'm in a hotel in the central part of the city. The odd building here or there has been reduced to rubble, but a lot of buildings like this one are still standing. If you're near the historic temples, that's a much different situation."

“People are very worried. They’re facing a very uncertain future. They’ve lost so much, and they’re not sure where to go from here.”

He says rural areas closer to the epicenter of the quake are likely facing greater devastation, and that it continues to be difficult for rescuers and media to get to those places.

Siegler reports that it appears the aftershocks following the earthquake are now subsiding.

"Certainly, I don't think blankets and tents, waterproof clothing would be turned away at the border by any means," he said. "... Just walking around the city, literally it seems as though every green space has been taken over by people living in limbo and camped out. Some are fortunate enough to have tarps, others not."

Siegler spoke with several people today who are still concerned about aftershocks and what to do now with dwindling food and water supplies.

"People are very worried. They're facing a very uncertain future," he said. "They've lost so much, and they're not sure where to go from here."

Guest

This segment aired on April 27, 2015.

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