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Obergefell V. Hodges May Go Down In History As Landmark Civil Rights Case11:14
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Supporters of same-sex marriages gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court waiting for its decision on April 28, 2015 in Washington, D.C. The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing arguments on whether gay couples have a constitutional right to wed -- a potentially historic decision that could see same-sex marriage recognized nationwide. (Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of same-sex marriages gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court waiting for its decision on April 28, 2015 in Washington, D.C. The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing arguments on whether gay couples have a constitutional right to wed -- a potentially historic decision that could see same-sex marriage recognized nationwide. (Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images)
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The Supreme Court today heard arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges, a case which is likely to go down in the history books alongside other landmark civil rights cases.

This one centers on two questions: first, whether there is a constitutional right to gay marriage, and second, if not, whether states that have bans on gay marriage have to recognize gay marriages performed in other states where it's legal.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with Harvard Law School professor Michael Klarman about the significance of Obergefell v. Hodges and where it fits in with other landmark Supreme Court cases, such as Brown v. Board of Education and Roe v. Wade.

Guest

This segment aired on April 28, 2015.

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