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As Greek Government Falters, Food Relief Put In The Hands Of The People05:47
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This photo taken on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 shows volunteers from a soup kitchen serving food to people, in Athens. Greece goes to the polls Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015 with voters given a tough choice over how to handle the country’s staggering national debt after six years of recession badly weakened its economy. The popular left-wing Syriza party is poised to defeat conservative Prime Minister Antonis Samaras, after campaigning on demands that other eurozone countries forgive at least half the bailout loan money received since 2010. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)
This photo taken on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 shows volunteers from a soup kitchen serving food to people, in Athens. Greece goes to the polls Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015 with voters given a tough choice over how to handle the country’s staggering national debt after six years of recession badly weakened its economy. The popular left-wing Syriza party is poised to defeat conservative Prime Minister Antonis Samaras, after campaigning on demands that other eurozone countries forgive at least half the bailout loan money received since 2010. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)
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As the world awaits the results of Greece's public vote this Sunday on whether or not they want to remain in the eurozone, the stalled Greek economy has put new pressure on Greek citizens, particularly in the area of food.

About 18 percent of Greek citizens need some kind of food aid, a number that has doubled since 2007. With closed banks, shuttered aid programs and frozen imports, the Greek government is not offering much to citizens in the way of relief.

In their stead, however, a number of private groups organized by the Greek people have essentially taken over the process of making sure Greeks are fed. Known as "solidarity groups," these NGOs and charity organizations want to make sure that in the absence of firm government, the people still have support.

Alex Theodoridis is the co-founder of Boroume, a group that connects food donors to aid organizations. Boroume distributed half a million meals around Greece during the first three months of this year. Theodoridis joins Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss what he calls "Civil Society 2.0."

Guest

This segment aired on July 3, 2015.

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