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One Arkansas Lumber Company That Relies On The Export-Import Bank05:00
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President Barack Obama, center, with Paul Sullivan, left, Vice President of International Business Development at Acrow Bridge, and Susan Jaime, right, CEO Ferra Coffee International, speaks during his meeting with small business owners to discuss the importance of the reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank in the White House on July 22, 2015. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)
President Barack Obama, center, with Paul Sullivan, left, Vice President of International Business Development at Acrow Bridge, and Susan Jaime, right, CEO Ferra Coffee International, speaks during his meeting with small business owners to discuss the importance of the reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank in the White House on July 22, 2015. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)
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Fortune 500 companies as well as small businesses are fuming over the failure of Congress to re-authorize the Export-Import Bank. The bank is a relatively unknown arm of the federal government that helps promote American businesses abroad, but some Tea Party-affiliated conservatives consider the bank a form of corporate welfare.

House lawmakers left for the summer recess without passing a bill that would have renewed the bank's charter, and some companies around the country are worried what they'll do without it.

Randy Barsalou, who runs BCH Trading, a lumber export firm, and a customer of the Export-Import Bank, joins Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd.

Guest

  • Randy Barsalou, co-owner of BHC Trading Co. and a customer of the Export-Import Bank.

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