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Remembering Katrina Through Art10:06
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Ten years ago this week New Orleans was under water. A decade later, people who survived the flood are still turning to art to make sense of Hurricane Katrina's fury.

Several of the city's major museums have acknowledged the anniversary with new exhibits, including one at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

As Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd reports, the exhibit "Ten Years Gone" explores the idea of commemoration, but for the most part refrains from reliving the trauma of Katrina by going beyond images of the storm-damaged city.

This is a photo from a series by Canadian photographer Isabelle Hayeur, who took pictures in Louisiana, New York and other places where water is both the lifebood of the place, but also the biggest threat. (Isabelle Hayeur)
This is a photo from a series by Canadian photographer Isabelle Hayeur, who took pictures in Louisiana, New York and other places where water is both the lifebood of the place, but also the biggest threat. (Isabelle Hayeur)
This is a frame from a video of Canadian artist Spring Hurlbut opening canisters of cremation ashes on film. The ashes belong to acquaintances who have died. (Spring Hurlbut)
This is a frame from a video of Canadian artist Spring Hurlbut opening canisters of cremation ashes on film. The ashes belong to acquaintances who have died. (Spring Hurlbut)
This New Orleans based community media project was created by reporter Jesse Hardman in partnership with Internews, GroundSource and WWNO. The Listening Post uses cell phones, public signs and roving recording devices to capture and share voices, information and opinions from around New Orleans. The goal is to create and expand conversations around important local issues. (Photo of Jesse Hardman's piece by Weenta Girmay)
This New Orleans based community media project was created by reporter Jesse Hardman in partnership with Internews, GroundSource and WWNO. The Listening Post uses cell phones, public signs and roving recording devices to capture and share voices, information and opinions from around New Orleans. The goal is to create and expand conversations around important local issues. (Photo of Jesse Hardman's piece by Weenta Girmay)

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This segment aired on September 3, 2015.

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