How Hurricane Patricia Compares To Past Storms05:20
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Residents of Boca de Pascuales, Colima State, Mexico, prepare to be evacuated before the arrival of hurricane Patricia. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an "extremely dangerous" major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. (Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents of Boca de Pascuales, Colima State, Mexico, prepare to be evacuated before the arrival of hurricane Patricia. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an "extremely dangerous" major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. (Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images)
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Mexico's Pacific coast is bracing for what may be the most powerful hurricane ever to make landfall. Hurricane Patricia, on track to hit Mexico late Friday, has become the strongest tropical cyclone ever measured at sea in the Western Hemisphere, with sustained winds up to 200 miles per hour, according to data gathered by the U.S. Air Force Hurricane Hunters aircrew.

Experts have compared the storm to Hurricanes Wilma and Linda, and some believe its landfall will outdo Typhoon Haiyan, which left 6,000 people dead when it struck the Philippines in 2013.

Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with Bryan Norcross of The Weather Channel for a look at Patricia and some of the most powerful storms in history.

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This segment aired on October 23, 2015.

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