Dirty Bombs And North Korea On Agenda At Nuclear Summit05:02
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U.S. President Barack Obama takes part in a trilateral meeting with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korea's President Park Geun-Hye on the sidelines of the Nuclear Security Summit at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on March 31, 2016 in Washington, D.C.  (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Barack Obama takes part in a trilateral meeting with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korea's President Park Geun-Hye on the sidelines of the Nuclear Security Summit at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on March 31, 2016 in Washington, D.C. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)
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In the wake of the terror attack in Brussels that killed 32 people, this week’s Nuclear Security Summit in Washington is expected to end up focusing on concerns over terrorists obtaining nuclear materials.

For the more than 50 world leaders in attendance, the concern isn’t simply whether ISIS can get a nuclear weapon, but also whether terror groups are exploring a "dirty bomb," which is a weapon that combines radioactive material with conventional explosives.

Thursday morning, President Obama met with Asian leaders ahead of the two-day summit to discuss North Korea’s nuclear threat. Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley.

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This segment aired on March 31, 2016.

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