Philadelphia, Pittsburgh And Alabama In Between? Not Really10:57
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People cast their ballots in a polling station during the presidential primary election on April 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
(Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images)
People cast their ballots in a polling station during the presidential primary election on April 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 3 years old.

With 71 Republican and 210 Democratic delegates, Pennsylvania is the biggest prize in today's presidential primaries. But appealing to the state’s voters can be difficult.

Pennsylvania, because of its diverse economies, communities, geography and politics, is sometimes described as a set of microstates, or as political strategist James Carville is often credited with saying, Pennsylvania is Philadelphia and Pittsburgh with Alabama in between.

While in Pennsylvania, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson set out to explore the state’s many different pockets, how they’ve changed and what the state’s diversity means for the 2016 presidential candidates.

Guests

  • Terry Madonna, director of the Center for Politics and Public Affairs and director of the Franklin & Marshall College Poll at Franklin & Marshall College. He tweets @terrymadonna.
  • Sabina Deitrick, co-director of the Urban and Regional Analysis Program at the University Center for Social and Urban research at the University of Pittsburgh. She tweets @deitrick.

This segment aired on April 26, 2016.

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