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North Korea Holds A Rare Party Congress04:49
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A general view shows portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il-Sung (L) and Kim Jong-Il (R) on the 'April 25 Palace', the venue of the 7th Workers Party Congress in Pyongyang on May 6, 2016.
North Korea on May 6 kicked off its biggest political show for a generation, aimed at cementing the absolute rule of leader Kim Jong-Un and shadowed by the possibility of an imminent nuclear test.  (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
A general view shows portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il-Sung (L) and Kim Jong-Il (R) on the 'April 25 Palace', the venue of the 7th Workers Party Congress in Pyongyang on May 6, 2016. North Korea on May 6 kicked off its biggest political show for a generation, aimed at cementing the absolute rule of leader Kim Jong-Un and shadowed by the possibility of an imminent nuclear test. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
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North Korea hasn't held a meeting of the Worker's Party since 1980, before its reclusive leader was even born. But Kim Jong Un is overseeing a ruling party congress meeting that opened Friday. The meeting is being seen as a further effort to consolidate his power and a showcase of the country’s stability and unity, despite tough new sanctions over North Korea's nuclear and missile programs. Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with security analyst Jim Walsh of MIT, who has been to North Korea.

Guest

  • Jim Walsh, Here & Now security analyst, expert in international security and research associate at MIT's Security Studies Program. He tweets @drjimwalshmit.

This segment aired on May 6, 2016.

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