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Journalists Train For Hostile Conflict In U.S. And Abroad05:25
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This article is more than 4 years old.

Reporters can now get training on how to avoid dangerous situations, and what to do if they are in one. And it's not only foreign assignments that can be hazardous; protests and political gatherings in the U.S. have turned violent. Armando Trull of WAMU has the story.

This story includes audio from UPI Radio's 1994 Year in Review.

Car accidents are one of the most common dangers in hostile news reporting and journalists are taught what to do especially when injuries happen. (Armando Trull/WAMU)
Car accidents are one of the most common dangers in hostile news reporting and journalists are taught what to do especially when injuries happen. (Armando Trull/WAMU)
Car accidents are one of the most common dangers in hostile news reporting and journalists are taught what to do especially when injuries happen. (Armando Trull/WAMU)
Car accidents are one of the most common dangers in hostile news reporting and journalists are taught what to do especially when injuries happen. (Armando Trull/WAMU)
Journalists are shown how to disarm potentially lethal encounters at checkpoints. (Armando Trull/WAMU)
Journalists are shown how to disarm potentially lethal encounters at checkpoints. (Armando Trull/WAMU)

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This segment aired on May 24, 2016.

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