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African Crocodiles Found In Florida Everglades05:10
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A crocodile is seen in a canal near the Florida Power & Light's Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant where they protect the crocodile and conduct research by counting their nests annually to record population changes June 28, 2012 near Florida City, Florida. Wasilewski, a biologist, studies the reptile and helps in developing and constructing the American crocodile nesting habitat near the power plant. The American crocodile had been on the endangered species list but has been taken off that list and put on the threatened list. With the success of the program to help save the crocodile their populations around developed areas will continue to grow which means that there may be more encounters between humans and the reptile.  (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A crocodile is seen in a canal near the Florida Power & Light's Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant where they protect the crocodile and conduct research by counting their nests annually to record population changes June 28, 2012 near Florida City, Florida. Wasilewski, a biologist, studies the reptile and helps in developing and constructing the American crocodile nesting habitat near the power plant. The American crocodile had been on the endangered species list but has been taken off that list and put on the threatened list. With the success of the program to help save the crocodile their populations around developed areas will continue to grow which means that there may be more encounters between humans and the reptile. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
This article is more than 3 years old.

As if alligators and pythons weren't spooky enough, researchers say they've discovered something new lurking in the swamps of the Florida Everglades.

DNA testing shows that three crocodiles found since 2009 are confirmed to be man-eating Nile crocodiles. They were brought to Florida from Africa as pets, but escaped.

University of Florida professor Frank Mazzotti tells Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson that Floridians don't need to panic – yet.

Guest

  • Frank Mazzotti, professor of wildlife ecology at the University of Florida.

This segment aired on May 25, 2016.

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