Remembering NPR's David Gilkey06:25
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Family, friends and colleagues are mourning the deaths of NPR journalist David Gilkey and his interpreter, Zabihullah Tamanna, who were killed while on assignment in Afghanistan yesterday. The two men were traveling with an Afghan Army unit when their convoy was attacked. Gilkey was 50. Tamanna was 38.

Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with NPR's David Greene about his late colleague.

See More Photos From David Gilkey

A girl stands in the middle of a poppy field as Marines pass by on patrol. From the story "In Afghanistan, Flowers Call The Shots," 2011. (David Gilkey/NPR)
A girl stands in the middle of a poppy field as Marines pass by on patrol. From the story "In Afghanistan, Flowers Call The Shots," 2011. (David Gilkey/NPR)
Afghan president Hamid Karzai held a rally in a remote village, where he struck a deal with an influential religious leader. Thousands gathered for the campaign event. From the story "Afghan President Karzai Rallies Support," 2009. (David Gilkey/NPR)
Afghan president Hamid Karzai held a rally in a remote village, where he struck a deal with an influential religious leader. Thousands gathered for the campaign event. From the story "Afghan President Karzai Rallies Support," 2009. (David Gilkey/NPR)
Local election officials escort donkeys carrying election materials on the way to the village of Quali Kuana in Badakhshan province in Afghanistan. From the story "Donkeys Deliver The Vote To Rural Afghanistan," 2009. (David Gilkey/NPR)
Local election officials escort donkeys carrying election materials on the way to the village of Quali Kuana in Badakhshan province in Afghanistan. From the story "Donkeys Deliver The Vote To Rural Afghanistan," 2009. (David Gilkey/NPR)
Bravo Company's Pvt. Cody Lee Ensley walks through the safety of the gates at an American base after a daylong fierce attack by insurgents near Payendi. From the story "Signs Of Traction In U.S. Fight Against Afghan Taliban," 2010. (David Gilkey/NPR)
Bravo Company's Pvt. Cody Lee Ensley walks through the safety of the gates at an American base after a daylong fierce attack by insurgents near Payendi. From the story "Signs Of Traction In U.S. Fight Against Afghan Taliban," 2010. (David Gilkey/NPR)
Liam, 2, accompanies his dad, Jake Romo, during rehab at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego. Romo, 22, lost both his legs while serving with the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, in Sangin, Afghanistan. From the story "For Wounded Marines, The Long, Hard Road Of Rehab," 2011. (David Gilkey/NPR)
Liam, 2, accompanies his dad, Jake Romo, during rehab at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego. Romo, 22, lost both his legs while serving with the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, in Sangin, Afghanistan. From the story "For Wounded Marines, The Long, Hard Road Of Rehab," 2011. (David Gilkey/NPR)
People stand in line for food at the U.N. Protection of Civilians site near Bentiu, South Sudan. Over 120,000 people live at the site, the biggest in the country. From the story "Five Days And Five Nights With Doctors Without Borders," 2016. (David Gilkey/NPR)
People stand in line for food at the U.N. Protection of Civilians site near Bentiu, South Sudan. Over 120,000 people live at the site, the biggest in the country. From the story "Five Days And Five Nights With Doctors Without Borders," 2016. (David Gilkey/NPR)

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This segment aired on June 6, 2016.

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