Breeding Coral That Can Survive Climate Change05:27
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A school of manini fish pass over a coral reef at Hanauma Bay on January 15, 2005 in Honolulu, Hawaii.  Many coral reefs are dying from water pollution (from sewage and agricultural runoff), dredging off the coast, careless collecting of coral specimens, and sedimentation. (Donald Miralle/Getty Images)
A school of manini fish pass over a coral reef at Hanauma Bay on January 15, 2005 in Honolulu, Hawaii. Many coral reefs are dying from water pollution (from sewage and agricultural runoff), dredging off the coast, careless collecting of coral specimens, and sedimentation. (Donald Miralle/Getty Images)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Coral reefs around the world have been severely damaged by coral bleaching, caused by warming ocean temperatures and acidification. But some corals are able to survive the stress that kills others, and that’s what the coral that marine biologist Ruth Gates is concentrating on.

She wants to breed this hearty coral to help restore bleached reefs. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Ruth Gates about her work.

Guest

Ruth Gates, a research professor and the director of the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology at the University of Hawaii. She tweets @RuthDGates.

This segment aired on June 13, 2016.

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