A Glimpse Into The Deobandi School Of Islam10:55
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In this picture taken on September 7, 2011 Muslim students prepare for their entry exams on campus of the Darul Uloom Deoband school of Islam. The 145-year-old Darululoom Deoband situated in the sleepy town of Deoband in north Indian state of Uttar Pradesh is acknowledged as the spiritual home for conservative Deobandi school of Islam and their methodology is followed by religious schools in Asia, Middle East, Britain and the United States. (Sajjad Hussain/ Getty Images)
In this picture taken on September 7, 2011 Muslim students prepare for their entry exams on campus of the Darul Uloom Deoband school of Islam. The 145-year-old Darululoom Deoband situated in the sleepy town of Deoband in north Indian state of Uttar Pradesh is acknowledged as the spiritual home for conservative Deobandi school of Islam and their methodology is followed by religious schools in Asia, Middle East, Britain and the United States. (Sajjad Hussain/ Getty Images)
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Note: This BBC interview can be heard in the Here & Now podcast or with the WBUR app.

BBC correspondent Owen Bennett Jones has been exploring the Deobandi school of Islam. It started in India when that country was under British rule. Its followers saw it as their mission to preserve the faith. But the peaceful missionary movement is also shadowed by a darker side.

In Pakistan, Deobandi has also inspired the Taliban. Here & Now's Robin Young talks with Jones about what he saw in both countries when he visited schools where Deobandi is taught and practiced.

Listen to part one and part two of Owen Bennett Jones' program on Deobandi

Guest

Owen Bennett Jones, BBC correspondent. He tweets @owenbennettjone

This segment aired on June 27, 2016.

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