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Millions Of Men Are Missing From The U.S. Workforce06:14
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Men between the ages of 25 and 54 are considered to be in their prime working years. But in the United States, the share of prime-age men who are neither working nor looking for work has doubled since the 1970s. (Lucia Castillo/Flickr)
Men between the ages of 25 and 54 are considered to be in their prime working years. But in the United States, the share of prime-age men who are neither working nor looking for work has doubled since the 1970s. (Lucia Castillo/Flickr)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Men between the ages of 25 and 54 are considered to be in their prime working years. But in the United States, the share of prime-age men who are neither working nor looking for work has doubled since the 1970s. Roughly one in six prime-age men in the U.S. are either unemployed or out of the workforce altogether.

So where have they all gone? Derek Thompson, a senior editor at The Atlantic, offers a possible answer in his conversation with Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson, as well as a way that could once again employ the millions of men missing from the U.S. labor force.

Guest

Derek Thompson, senior editor at The Atlantic. He tweets at @DKThomp.

This segment aired on July 1, 2016.

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