Advertisement

Death Toll Climbs In Baghdad Bombing03:48
Download

Play
Iraqi men mourn over bodies after they lost five members of their family in a suicide bombing that ripped through Baghdad's busy shopping district of Karrada, during their funeral in the holy Iraqi city of Najaf on July 3, 2016. 
The blast hit the Karrada district early in the day as the area was packed with shoppers ahead of this week's holiday marking the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, killing at least 75 people in the deadliest single attack this year in Iraq's capital. (HAIDAR HAMDANI/AFP/Getty Images)
Iraqi men mourn over bodies after they lost five members of their family in a suicide bombing that ripped through Baghdad's busy shopping district of Karrada, during their funeral in the holy Iraqi city of Najaf on July 3, 2016. The blast hit the Karrada district early in the day as the area was packed with shoppers ahead of this week's holiday marking the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, killing at least 75 people in the deadliest single attack this year in Iraq's capital. (HAIDAR HAMDANI/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Authorities say at least 150 people are dead after Sunday's huge truck bomb blast in the Iraqi capital of Baghdad. ISIS has claimed responsibility for what is one of the single deadliest bombings in more than a decade of war and insurgency in the country. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR correspondent Alice Fordham, who's in Beirut.

Guest

Alice Fordham, NPR International Correspondent. She tweets @alicefordham.

This segment aired on July 4, 2016.

Advertisement

Advertisement